The Afternoon Report, Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Brought to you by Boneau/Bryan-Brown
Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Today’s Tweets from BBB
Follow us on Twitter – http://twitter.com/BBBway

JERSEY BOYS sets new record in Hershey $1,282,369 for week ending 3/3/13 via @JerseyBoysInfo • • • New Broadway Cast Recording for @ANNIEonBroadway via Shout! Broadway! • • • Happy first preview to @VANYASONIA! #breakaleg • • • Happy opening to @RTC_NYC’s TALLEY’S FOLLY and @keencompany’s THE OLD BOY! #breakaleg • • •

London Theater Journal: Memory Plays
NYTimes.com/ArtsBeat Blog – by BEN BRANTLEY

One thing, at least, is certain in both the fascinating new versions of Harold Pinter’s “Old Times” that are keeping audiences in a rapt state of perplexity here: The man loses.

Admittedly, he loses in two very different ways, even though he is played by the same actor, a marvelous Rufus Sewell. But there’s no doubt that by the end of the matinee and evening performances I saw on Saturday, he was a thoroughly defeated soul.

As for the victor, well, it’s the wife, not the other woman – isn’t it? — whether she is played (with such tantalizing dissimilarities) by Kristin Scott Thomas or Lia Williams. Yes, I’d say that the real power definitely lies with the wife. Oh, scratch that “definitely,” and scratch “real,” too. We are discussing a Pinter play.

I assure that you will long continue that discussion, even if only in your mind, if you’re lucky enough to see Ian Rickson’s productions of “Old Times” — the 1971 portrait of reminiscence as a high-stakes competition among a husband, a wife and her best friend — at the Harold Pinter Theater in the West End. And if you see it twice — which means seeing Ms. Thomas and Ms. Williams in both female roles — you’ll find you have even more to talk about.

To read this article, click the link below
http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/05/london-theater-journal-memory-plays/

The TweetDeck App: 2008-2013
Atlantic Wire – by ADAM CLARK ESTES

The family of TweetDeck apps that made it easier to read and compose microblog posts passed away on Monday evening. It was just four years old.

The original TweetDeck apps was born on July 4, 2008 to Iain Dodsworth, a former IT worker and father of two from the United Kingdom. The Adobe Air-based app quickly became popular with media professionals for its ease-of-use and relatively robust feature set, especially compared to Twitter’s then-clunky website. TweetDeck’s popularity surged even further with the release of an iPhone app in 2009 and an iPad app in 2010, when an Android app also made its way to the marketplace. Then, in May 2011, Twitter stunned the world by buying TweetDeck for $40 million. (Okay, it wasn’t that stunning — it actually made total sense.) The deal made Dodsworth a multi-millionaire overnight.

Twitter turned out to be a loving home for the TweetDeck apps, in the beginning at least. A little over six months after the acquisition, the San Francisco company released an impressive new suite of upgrades to the TweetDeck platform, including a new HTML5 web app that could run in a browser window. This is also when the TweetDeck apps started showing signs off illness.

To read this article, click the link below
http://www.theatlanticwire.com/technology/2013/03/tweetdeck-2008-2013/62752/


Broadway Ad Breakdowns:

Sunday, March 3, 2013
(b/w unless otherwise indicated)

New York Times
ARTS & LEISURE

Les Misérables
2 Pages – Color
Wicked
Quarter Page – Color
Newsies
2” x 7” – Color

Bergen Record
Better Living

Annie
Strip – Color

Newsday
FanFare

Jersey Boys
Strip – Color

Star-Ledger
Arts & Escapes

Annie
Strip – Color

Daily News
No theatrical advertising

New York Post
No theatrical advertising

Friday, March 1, 2013
(b/w unless otherwise indicated)
New York Times
ARTS & LEISURE

Lucky Guy
6” x 3” – Color

The Wall St Journal
Arena

The Book of Mormon
Strip – Color

Bergen Record
No theatrical advertising\

Daily News
No theatrical advertising

Newsday
No theatrical advertising

New York Post
No theatrical advertising

Star-Ledger
No theatrical advertising

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